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The Omo and Mago National parks
The Omo and Mago National Parks, showing the approximate area of Mursi occupation.
A debate in progress
A debate in progress at Mi, northern Mursiland (David Turton 1974)
The Mursi and their neighbours (a)
The Mursi and their neighbours.
Upland plains of the lower Omo valley - topography and drainage
Upland plains of the Lower Omo Valley – topography and drainage. The Mursi occupy the area between the Omo and Mago rivers as far north as the river Mara. There are also Mursi settlements in the upper Mago valley, north of Mt Mago.
Classification of Surmic languages
Classification of Surmic languages, from Gerrit Dimmendaal (ed.) Surmic Languages and Cultures, Rudger Koppe Verlag, Cologne, 1998, p. 13.
Local groups in Mursiland
Local groups (bhuranyoga) in Mursiland. The map shows the sections of the Omo river-bank along which the members of each group practice flood cultivation for approximately half the year (October-February).
Ulikoro Konyonomora
Ulikoro Konyonomora (Komor-a-kora), Kon Ba, 2004
The Omo river
The Omo river, looking south. April 1981
Tourist at Morla
test image
Duelling
Duelling: A bout in progress, 1996.
Debate
Thatching a grain store
Nga Mokonyi Keketokenno
Nga Mokonyi Keketokenno, one month after her lip had been pierced, 1969.
Komor-a-kora blessing duelling contestants
Ulikoro Konyonomora (Komor-a-kora) blessing duelling contestants in 1996.
Komor-a-kora blessing the herds
Ulikoro Konyonomora (Komor-a-kora) blessing the herds at a 'Bio Lama' ceremony in 1969.
Gallery
Nitha
At dawn, Garana names the new set (David Turton, 1991)
The River Omo at Kurum
The River Omo at Kurum, in the dry season (David Turton, 1991)
Zones of the Southern Regional State
Map of Zones of the Southern Regional State
Local groups in Mursiland
Local groups (bhuranyoga) in Mursiland. The map shows the sections of the Omo river-bank along which the members of each group practice flood cultivation for approximately half the year (October-February).
The Mursi and their neighbours
The Mursi and their neighbours.
Zones of the Southern Regional State
Zones of the Southern Regional State.
Still taken from Interview with Komor-a-kora, Bio-iton-giga and Arinyatuin
Still taken from Conversation in the grain store
Still taken from Tourists at the bridge
Still taken from The Nitha
The Omo and Mago National Parks
The Omo and Mago National Parks, showing the approximate area of Mursi occupation.
Overgrown cultivation area at Alaka, December 2009
Still taken from People and parks
Komorajehola (Ulijeholi Konyonomora)
Komorajehola (Ulijeholi Konyonomora), the new Komoru of the northern Mursi, February 2012 (Photo: Ulirege Rege)
Lake Turkana
Lake Turkana: Central Island National Park (Guy Dubbonet, 2012)
A Community-based Map of Mursiland
This map was made over a two year period by asking Mursi what features of their territory it was important to map. Being pastoralists, their first concern was with resources used by cattle, particularly saltlicks and hot springs from which cattle as well as wildlife obtain essential mineral nutrients. They also wanted to map their villages and cultivation sites. A Mursi was given GPS training to enable him to assist with the map making. When a base map of Mursi land use had been completed, this was filled in with other important features. The symbols on the map were drawn by a Mursi so that other Mursi would have an easier time identifying the map features. Many Mursi who cannot read or write can read this map. They are helped in identifying such features as grasslands and rivers by the high quality of the satellite images. A version of the map has also been made in the Mursi language using the syllabic script of Amharic, the national language of Ethiopia. The Mursi have been impressed by the way the map gives them the ability to talk about their land. They often spread it out on a cowskin to discuss its various features and never seem to tire of looking at it. The map has been endorsed by many community leaders, some of whom are using it to plan the Mursi Community Conservation Area. This is a combined conservation and tourism management project, designed to provide revenue for the Mursi community in response to the loss of grazing and water resources over the past half century, due partly to climate change and partly to the encroachment of national parks on their territory.
The Mursi and their neighbours (b)
Ulikoro Konyonomora was the priest of the Dola until his death in 2012. In this photograph, he is pictured wearing the necklace of the priest, which is the priestly insignia.
Ulikoro Konyonomora was the priest of the Dola until his death in 2012. In this photograph, he is pictured wearing the necklace of the priest, which is the priestly insignia.
What Future for Lake Turkana?
Lake Turkana diagram
Men's traditional bark cloth
Image taken in 1896 on Bottego expedition (Vannutelli and Citerni 1899:320)
Thatching
Thatching a grain store at Kon Ba, Mago Valley (Ben Dome, 2004)
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